SYDNEY AND THE OPERA HOUSE

SYDNEY AND THE OPERA HOUSE

THE BUILDING THAT WON THE DANISH ARCHITECT JORN UTZON THE 2003 PRITZKER ARCHITECTURE PRIZE HAS BEEN ON THE UNESCO’S WORLD HERITAGE LIST SINCE 2007.

The Sydney Opera House which is the face of Sidney on postcards leaves everyone who sees it amazed with its autonomous location in the middle of the sea, its amazing appearance that reminiscences sliced orange peels and of course its size. The building is the symbol of Sydney, and even the symbol of modern Australia. The building that won Danish architect Jorn Utzon the 2003 Pritzker Architecture Prize has been on the UNESCO’s World Heritage List since 2007.

The official construction of the Opera House began in March 1959. The project was built in three stages: Stage I (1959-1963), Stage II (1963-1967) and Stage III (1967-1973). The Sydney Opera House was expected to be inaugurated in 1963 but instead it was opened in 1973. While it was expected to cost 7 million dollars, its final cost exceeded 100 million dollars.

The building is 183 m tall and 118 m wide as it covers 1.8 hectares of land. Its unique roof goes as high as 67 meters and was decked with 1 million 56 thousand ceramic tiles imported from Sweden. 580 concrete supports go as deep as 2222 meters below the ground to carry the 160 thousand ton structure.

One of the most important structures of the 20th century

The Opera house has five theatre halls: the 2.679 seat Concert Hall, the 1.547 seat Opera Theatre, the 544 seat Drama Theatre, the 398 seat Playhouse, and the 364 seat Studio Theatre. The place holds a large number of changing rooms, rehearsal studios, 4 cafeterias, 6 bars and a large number of gift shops. The building, which is one of the most distinguishing buildings of the 20th century and one of the famous art centers of the world, promises pleasant hours to the visitors.