WILTSHIRE AND STONEHENGE

WILTSHIRE AND STONEHENGE

STONEHENGE THAT REMAINS MYSTERY FOR FIVE THOUSAND YEARS IS LISTED IN UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE LIST. 

The Stonehenge stone circle, which dates back to 8000 BC, was built in Wiltshire, England. It is a monument consisting of at least 5 levels between the Neolithic Age and the Bronze Age. The circle monument, which is related to astronomy, astrology, geometry, and paganism, is attributed to the Druids, a class of Celt priests. Religious rites are said to be made here.

Having been listed in UNESCO World Heritage List in 1986, Stonehenge, still unknown why it was built, was the largest cemetery in England in 3000 BC. Astronomer Sir Fred Hoyle proved that Stonehenge could be used to predict eclipses by moving marking stones around the outer ring. Recent research has shown that there are 17 religious monuments and structures at the same age with the monument on the hills around Stonehenge.

The stone structure, which has three rows of roof-bearing posts, is spread over an area of 300 square meters and has a slightly trapezoidal shape. It is the only stone circle composed of thirty stones in an upright position (seventeen of them still standing), which have been chiseled, smoothed and moved from the outside to the local area, including the rounded lintel stones (an architectural block which is placed horizontally on vertical spaces such as doors and windows to provide the continuation of a wall) placed on the standing stones, therefore, creating entrance holes shaped in circles. It is very difficult for visitors to enter the circle of stones. You can only see them from 2 to 5 meters away.